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City Slickers (1991)

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City Slickers (1991)

Nordstjernan | Minnesota Historical Society

Jim Skelton 1937 - 2018 Jim's contribution to the Law went beyond defending the accused.
His passion was educating other lawyers and mentoring beginners in the field.
For more than fifty years, Jim helped people understand the way justice really works.
He held weekly seminars and wrote three highly recommended books sharing years of experience and study.
They gave new lawyers practical information about how courts really work so they had a real chance to keep their clients out of jail.
Since Ray started Execution Watch in 2008, Jim was the chief legal advisor.
He assiduously prepared the histories of each case, all available on the backpages of each prisoner sacrificed to the god of state power.
Jim was not on retainer.
We will sorely miss his gravelly voice and his willingness to call the shots even when Ray disagreed.
Peter needs to be careful now about who he doesn't let in because Jim the Defender is standing behind him.
Apologies to atheists and others.
Execution Watch with Ray Hill can be heard on KPFT 90.
Paul Storey Wednesday, April 12, 2018 at 6:00 pm Execution Sent to death row for the 2006 robbery-murder of an assistant manager at a miniature golf center in Hurst.
Storey argued on appeal that his attorneys were deficient during sentencing in his 2008 capital murder trial in Fort Worth, because they did not pursue more evidence of his depression and low level of intellectual functioning.
He also alleged a black juror was improperly excluded due to race.
Storey is African-American; his victim was Caucasian.
Tilon Carter Tuesday, May 16, 2018 at 6:00 pm Execution Sentenced to death for the 2004 robbery and slaying of a Fort Worth man in his home.
Money and a shotgun were taken.
Evidenced showed that the victim, a retired Bell Helicopter worker, kept cash in containers scattered around his home.
Carter's fall partner, Leketha Allen, was also convicted of the murder.
Allen was sentenced to prison.
Steven Long Wednesday, June 28, 2018 at 6:00 pm Execution Sentenced to death for the 2005 sexual assault and strangulation of an 11-year-old Dallas girl, Long argued on appeal that he was intellectually disabled, making him ineligible for the death penalty.
The courts denied his request for a hearing to challenge findings that he purposely did poorly on IQ tests as part of his appeal strategy.
Kosoul Chanthakoumman Wednesday, July 19, 2018 at 6:00 pm Execution The native of Laos was convicted of the July 2006 murder of real estate agent Sarah Walker inside a model home in McKinney, near Dallas.
His appeals attorneys argued that his legal representation at trial was inadequate.
Past Executions James Bigby Tuesday, March 14, 2018 Execution A north Texas auto mechanic convicted in the 1987 slayings of a man and his infant son.
Bigby's lawyers didn't dispute his actions but noted he'd been treated three times for mental disorders before the killings.
They argued he shouldn't be executed because his paranoid schizophrenia and frustrations about a workers' compensation claim led to the slayings.
Rolando Ruiz Tuesday, March 7, 2018 Execution Sentenced to death following his conviction as the shooter in a 1992 murder for hire.
Attorneys for Ruiz say his trial and original appeals lawyers failed to investigate and present mitigating evidence for his punishment hearing.
His attorneys also contend that execution two-and-half decades after his conviction would constitute cruel and unusual punishment.
Tilon Carter Tuesday, February 7, 2018 Execution Sentenced to death for the 2004 robbery and slaying of a Fort Worth man in his home.
Money and a shotgun were taken.
Evidenced showed that the victim, a retired Bell Helicopter worker, kept cash in containers scattered around his home.
Carter's fall partner, Leketha Allen, was also convicted of the murder.
Allen was sentenced to prison.
John Ramirez Thursday, February 2, 2018 Execution Sent to death row following his conviction in the murder of a convenience store clerk during a 2004 robbery in Corpus Christi.
He was arrested after evading police for four years.
Ramirez's trial attorneys said he should have been convicted of the lesser charge of murder because he killed Castro but didn't rob him.
Terry Edwards Thursday, January 26, 2018 Execution Sentenced to death following his conviction in a 2002 double homicide committed during the armed robbery of a sandwich shop from which he had been fired.
His appellate attorneys argued that the Dallas County judge who presided over Edwards' trial gave improper instructions during jury selection, violating his right to an impartial panel.
Kosoul Chanthakoumman Wednesday, January 25, 2018 Execution The native of Laos was convicted of the July 2006 murder of real estate agent Sarah Walker inside a model home in McKinney, outside Dallas.
Christopher Wilkins Wednesday, January 11, 2018 Execution Condemned after testifying that he had committed a string of crimes in 2005 in which he killed three men in two days.
John Battaglia Wednesday, December 7, 2018 Execution Convicted of murdering two of his daughters, ages 6 and 9, in Dallas in 2001.
A previous execution date of March 2018 was stayed so a hearing could be held to evaluate claims by defense attorneys that Battaglia is mentally incompetent.
His latest date was set because the hearing could only go forward if an execution date was pending.
Ramiro Gonzales Wednesday, November 2, 2018 Execution Sentenced to death in the 2001 kidnapping-slaying of his drug supplier's girlfriend at a ranch in northern Medina County.
On appeal, Gonzales' court-appointed attorneys said his trial attorneys were ineffective because they failed to present evidence that he suffered from Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.
An execution date of Aug.
Barney Fuller Wednesday, October 5, 2018 Execution Fuller, from Lovelady, Texas, pleaded guilty to killing a couple who lived near him.
At the time of the 2003 slayings, Fuller was awaiting trial on charges of making a terroristic threat against them.
He was arrested at his home after a nearly nine-hour standoff with police.
Robert Jennings Wednesday, September 14, 2018 Execution Condemned for the shooting death of a Houston vice officer during a robbery of an adult bookstore in 1998.
The officer was arresting a store clerk for municipal violations.
Jennings' fall partner received prison time.
The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, in a 5-4 ruling, stayed an execution date of Sept.
Supreme Court Refused in May 2018 to review his case.
According to court testimony, the woman's husband enlisted Ruiz in 1992 to kill her so he could collect life-insurance money.
In 2007, Ruiz got within an hour of execution when a federal appeals court gave him a reprieve.
He was again scheduled to be executed Aug.
Wood was convicted under the Texas law of parties, which makes the participant in a capital murder equally responsible for the crime.
Robert Pruett Tuesday, August 23, 2018 Execution He has steadfastly claimed that others framed him in the 2002 killing of a corrections officer who was stabbed to death at a prison near Corpus Christi.
Pruett's execution date of Aug.
On appeal, Gonzales' court-appointed attorneys said his trial attorneys were ineffective because they failed to present evidence that he suffered from Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.
Perry Williams Thursday, July 14, 2018 Execution Condemned in the slaying in 2000 of a Houston medical student in a robbery-kidnapping.
An execution date in September 2018 was put off so an attorney could be appointed to assist Williams in his appeals.
His two fall partners were sentenced to prison time.
A July 2018 date of execution was postponed indefinitely by a Houston district court judge pending test results for the drugs to be used in his execution.
Robert Roberson Tuesday, June 21, 2018 Execution Convicted in the death of his 2-year-old daughter at their home in Palestine.
Physicians refuted his contention that the girl died of a fall from a bed, saying there was no way her extensive injuries could have been caused by a fall.
On appeal, Roberson asserted that his attorneys had performed ineffectively.
On June 16, 2018, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals granted Roberson a stay of execution, previously scheduled June 21.
The stay was based on advances in the understanding of shaken baby syndrome.
Charles Flores Thursday, June 2, 2018 Execution On death row for the 1998 shooting death of a Dallas-area woman during an attempted robbery at her home.
His attorneys argued that an accomplice fired the fatal shot.
Flores' death date of June 2, 2018, was stayed by The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals with six days to spare.
The panel heard new evidence that the testimony of a key witness was tainted by a hypnosis session utilizing outdated science.
Pablo Vasquez Wednesday, April 6, 2018 Execution Convicted of the capital murder of a 12-year-old boy whose slaying in 1998 stirred up talk of Satanism along the Rio Grande.
John Battaglia Wednesday, March 30, 2018 Execution Sentenced to death for his conviction in the shooting deaths of his two daughters, 6 and 9, in Deep Ellum in 2009.
Hours before his scheduled execution on March 30, 2018, Battaglia prevailed in an appeal to the Fifth US Circuit Court of Appeals.
Adam Ward Tuesday, March 22, 2018 Execution A Commerce man convicted in the 2005 shooting death of a city code enforcement officer as he tried to write up some violations at Ward's property.
Coy Wesbrook Wednesday, March 9, 2018 Execution A former security guard, condemned in a 1997 shooting spree in which his ex-wife and four others were killed at an apartment complex in Channelview, just east of Houston.
Gustavo Garcia Tuesday, February 16, 2018 Execution Convicted in the fatal shooting of a clerk during the robbery of a beverage store when he was 19.
The Plano teen was sentenced to death in January 1992.
Garcia's attorneys contend that his written confession should have been thrown out because it did not include language that he had "knowingly, intelligently and voluntarily" waived his right to remain silent.
The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals vacated his conviction in 1994, then reinstated it in a follow-up hearing.
Garcia gained notoriety in 1998 by joining six other inmates in a prison escape.
Unlike the others, Garcia surrendered before making it off prison grounds.
He received a new sentencing hearing in 2000 after a state psychologist testified that being Hispanic made him a threat.
He was handed another death sentence the following year.
In January 2018, the U.
Supreme Court declined to hear his appeal.
James Freeman Wednesday, January 27, 2018 Execution Given the death penalty following his conviction in the 2007 slaying of a game warden in El Campo during a chase by law-enforcement officials.
Richard Masterson Wednesday, January 20, 2018 Execution Condemned in the 2001 choking death of a Houston female impersonator.
A federal appeals court set in motion the assignment of an execution date when it refused to grant Masterson the permission he needed to file an appeal with the U.
His attorneys argued that his previous attorneys were deficient in representing him and that his confession to police was improper.
Raphael Holiday Wednesday, November 18, 2018 Execution Convicted of capital murder in a Madison County fire, later determined to be arson, that resulted in the deaths of his young daughter and her two half-sisters In 2000.
Circuit Court of Appeals in 2018 refused claims by Holiday's attorneys that: testimony against him was allowed improperly at his trial in Huntsville in 2002, his indictment was flawed, and a juror was removed improperly during jury selection.
Gilmar Guevara Tuesday, November 10, 2018 Execution Condemned in the fatal shooting of two store clerks during an attempted robbery in 2000.
The Salvadoran national argued on appeal that the legal help at his Harris County trial in 2001 was deficient and that he has a mental impairment that would make his execution illegal.
Julius Murphy Tuesday, November 3, 2018 Execution His latest execution date comes nine years after a previous date was put on hold by the state's highest criminal court, which ordered the original trial court to hear claims that included mental retardation.
Murphy received the death penalty following his conviction in the 1997 fatal shooting of a man in Texarkana.
Christopher Wilkins Wednesday, October 28, 2018 Execution Sentenced to death following his conviction in 2008 on capital murder charges in the deaths of two men in Fort Worth.
His appellate attorney argued unsuccessfully that the court should delay setting an execution date, because she needed more time to file appeals.
Wilkins' previous attorney did not investigate his case adequately, she asserted.
Licho Escamilla Wednesday, October 14, 2018 Execution Convicted of killing a Dallas policeman outside a nightclub where the officer was working off-duty security on Thanksgiving weekend 2001.
A fight broke out and spilled into the parking lot, where he was shot to death.
Juan Garcia Tuesday, October 6, 2018 Execution Sentenced to death for a Houston murder-robbery committed when he was 18.
In March 2018, the U.
Supreme Court refused his appeal.
Garcia's attorneys said he had poor legal help during his trial in 2000 and that he is mentally impaired, making him ineligible for the death penalty.
His appellate lawyers argued in that he had deficient legal help at his trial.
Williams contended the slaying was accidental.
An earlier execution date of Sept.
He had been without one since firing his earlier in the year.
Wednesday, September 2, 2018 Execution Has been on death row since 2000 for the 1998 robbery-murder of a preacher.
The Lubbock County man claimed on appeal that his lawyers failed to fully investigate prosecution evidence that he was a leader of a prison gang, and william hill complaints they misled him into not testifying at a resentencing hearing.
A judge stayed a previous execution date of Sept.
Bernardo Tercero Wednesday, August 26, 2018 Execution The Nicaraguan national was convicted of shooting to death a man during the robbery of a Houston dry-cleaning shop in 1997.
His execution date of Aug.
Tracy Beatty Thursday, August 13, 2018 Execution Convicted in the 2003 strangling death of his mother william hill complaints Smith County.
Beatty had recently been paroled to her house.
A federal court ruled that he was not entitled to pursue appeals that argued he had poor legal representation at trial.
Daniel Lopez Wednesday, August 12, 2018 Execution A volunteer, the term for a death-row prisoner who drops all appeals and, essentially, commits suicide by execution.
In 2018, Lopez wrote to his original trial court to ask that he be put to death as soon as possible, setting in motion a process that ended in in May 2018, when his death warrant was delivered to the warden.
Lopez was convicted in a 2009 automobile crash that claimed the life of a Corpus Christi Police lieutenant who was setting out spike strips in an attempt to stop Lopez during a high-speed chase.
Clifton Williams Thursday, July 16, 2018 Execution Condemned in the 2005 death of an elderly woman during a robbery in her home in Tyler, Texas.
Appeals lawyers contended Williams had deficient legal help at his Smith County trial and that he is mentally impaired, making him ineligible for the death penalty.
Gregory Russeau Thursday, June 18, 2018 Execution The Tyler man was sentenced to death for the 2001 murder-robbery of an auto mechanic.
Russeau's initial death sentence was thrown out on appeal, but a second sentencing hearing produced the same result.
In his appeals, he argued that, his trial attorneys gave inadequate assistance, trial prosecutors used planted evidence, and lawyers at his second punishment trial had a conflict because they also represented him at his first trial, rendering problematic a common basis for appeals in death-penalty cases, that the trial attorneys provided poor representation.
Lester Bower Wednesday, June 3, 2018 Execution Bower may not be the longest-serving person on Texas death row, but he's close to it.
The chemical salesman was convicted in the 1984 execution-style murders of four men at an airplane hangar on a ranch north of Dallas.
Bower, who had no previous criminal history, has steadfastly maintained his innocence.
No fingerprints put him at the scene.
No witnesses saw him there.
The murder weapon never was recovered.
Pointing away from Bower is the allegation by an informant, whom police will not identify, that her ex-boyfriend and three accomplices committed the murders in the course of a drug deal.
Derrick Charles Tuesday, May 12, 2018 Execution Condemned in the slayings of three people at their Houston home in 2002.
A Harris County jury in 2003 decided he should die for the deaths of his 15-year-old girlfriend, her 44-year-old mother and the girlfriend's 77-year-old grandfather.
Supreme Court declined Oct.
The previous year, the 5th U.
Circuit Court of Appeals rejected arguments that the Houston man had shoddy legal help at his trial.
Robert Pruett Tuesday, April 28, 2018 Execution Condemned in the 1999 slaying of a prison guard at the McConnell Unit in Beeville, Texas.
He had been slated for execution on May 21, 2018, but was granted a stay so he could appeal a judge's previous ruling.
Pruett has steadfastly denied that he had any role in the guard's death.
Hours before Pruett's scheduled execution April 28, the original trial judge, Bert Richardson, granted a request by defense attorneys that the execution date be withdrawn so further DNA testing may be done on the evidence.
Richard Vasquez Thursday, April 23, 2018 Execution The Corpus Christi man was condemned in the 1998 fatal beating of his girlfriend's 4-year-old daughter.
His death sentence survived years of appeals, even though a federal appeals court described his trial attorneys' performance at sentencing as "deficient," citing their failure to uncover Vasquez's own childhood abuse, which the court called "a frightening portrait of addiction and destruction.
Vasquez was addicted by age 13.
Wednesday, April 15, 2018 Execution Convicted in the 2001 slaying of a San Antonio police officer after a foot chase in which the men struggled and Garza grabbed the officer's gun, then shot him, according to court documents.
His trial attorneys said he acted in self defense.
Appellate lawyers said his trial attorneys failed to properly question jurors about their opinions on the death penalty, didn't submit enough mitigating evidence and weren't able to include complaints of excessive use of force that had been filed against the officer.
Kent Sprouse Thursday, April 9, 2018 Execution The Missouri native was convicted in the 2002 shooting deaths of a North Texas police officer and a bystander in Ferris, Texas.
The Ferris police officer was responding to a report of a man with a gun at a service station.
Sprouse's attorneys argued on appeal that he is mentally ill and therefore ineligible for execution.
Randall Mays Wednesday, March 18, 2018 Execution Condemned in the slaying of a sheriff's deputy during a shootout that took place in 2007 after Mays barricaded himself inside his home in Payne Springs, about 55 miles southeast of Dallas.
He argued unsuccessfully on appeal that he had insufficient legal representation at his trial and that his execution would be unconstitutional because he is mentally ill.
Manuel Vasquez Wednesday, March 11, 2018 Execution Sentenced to die for strangling to death a 51-year-old woman in San Antonio in 1998 in a hit ordered by the Mexican Mafia because the woman refused to pay the gang.
Vasquez's previous execution date of Aug.
Rodney Reed Thursday, March 5, 2018 Execution A judge ordered additional testing on crime-scene evidence during the same hearing at which he gave Reed a death date.
Reed was convicted in the 1996 strangling death of a young woman.
Anti-death penalty groups and family members lobbied for a new trial for Reed in light of evidence pointing to other suspects.
The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals stayed Reed's execution on Feb.
Tuesday, February 10, 2018 Execution One of the longest-serving prisoners on Texas death row, Bower was convicted in the execution-style shooting deaths of four men in an airplane hangar in Sherman, Texas, in 1984.
Donald Newbury Wednesday, February 4, 2018 Execution While serving a 99-year sentence for robbery, he joined six fellow prisoners in escaping from the John B.
Connally Unit near Kenedy, Texas, on December 13, 2000.
He and other escapees were convicted of shooting to death an Irving police officer as they fled after robbing a store.
Robert Ladd Thursday, January 29, 2018 Execution Condemned in the sexual assault and slaying of a Tyler woman during a burglary in 1996.
He appealed his conviction and death sentence, saying prosecutors used illegal tactics to exclude minorities from the jury and presented insufficient evidence at trial.
Ladd also challenged the judge's instruction to jurors that they had the option to convict him under the Texas law of parties.
Garcia White Wednesday, January 28, 2018 Execution Sent to death row for the 1989 slayings of 16-year-old twin sisters with whom he had an argument while smoking crack cocaine at their home.
White asserted in appeals that jury selection, jury instructions, his statements to police, and the judge's punishment charge were all improper.
During White's trial, Houston Police analysts testified that DNA from the crime scene matched his.
But retest results made public in 2004 by the prosecutor's office indicated a private lab was unable to duplicate the results.
Arnold Prieto Wednesday, January 21, 2018 Execution Convicted in the murder of three people, including his co-defendants' great-aunt and great-uncle, in a 1993 home robbery in San Antonio.
Before Prieto's conviction, prosecutors offered him two 30-year terms in exchange for his testimony against a co-defendant.
Richard Vasquez Thursday, January 15, 2018 Execution The Corpus Christi man was condemned in the 1998 fatal beating of his girlfriend's 4-year-old daughter.
His death sentence survived years of appeals, even though a federal appeals court described his trial attorneys' performance at sentencing as "deficient," citing their failure to uncover Vasquez's own childhood abuse, which the court called "a frightening portrait of addiction and destruction.
Vasquez was addicted by age 13.
Rodney Reed Wednesday, January 14, 2018 Execution A judge ordered additional testing on crime-scene evidence during the same hearing at which he gave Reed a death date.
Reed was convicted in the 1996 strangling death of a young woman.
Anti-death penalty groups and family members have lobbied for a new trial for Reed in light of evidence pointing to other suspects.
Scott Panetti Wednesday, December 3, 2018 Execution Convicted in the September 1992 shooting deaths of his in-laws inside their Fredericksburg home, Panetti told police it was his alter ego, Sarge, who committed the slayings.
Panetti's previous execution date was put off by the Supreme Court, though the justices refused last month to hear his latest appeal, clearing the way for a new death date to be set.
He was diagnosed as schizophrenic and hospitalized multiple times in the 10 years leading up the the slayings.
Panetti was allowed to represent himself at trial.
He wore a purple cowboy outfit and called witnesses including John F.
Kennedy and Jesus Christ.
Mental health professionals who have evaluated Panetti say he believes the State of Texas wishes to kill him to prevent him from preaching the Gospel.
Miguel Paredes Tuesday, October 28, 2018 Execution Convicted of acting with John Saenz and Greg Alvarado in 2000 to shoot and kill three people in San Antonio.
Paredes was one of 20 children born to poor, Mexican-immigrant parents.
While in prison, he wrote Part 3 of a series called, "Letter to a Future Death Row Inmate.
His execution date was set after he wrote to his lawyer earlier this year, instructing him to drop all appeals.
A court-ordered evaluation determined that Hatten was mentally competent to request the speeding up of his own death.
Two days before his scheduled execution, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals issued a reprieve, ordering his trial court to resolve within the next six months a 1997 filing that was never decided.
Lisa Coleman Wednesday, September 17, 2018 Execution Received an execution date after the U.
Supreme Court refused in February 2018 to review her appeal.
She was convicted of having a role in the 2004 death of her live-in girlfriend's son near Fort Worth.
The girlfriend, Marcella Williams, who was 14 when she had the child, was also charged with capital murder but pleaded guilty in exchange for a life sentence.
Willie Trottie Wednesday, September 10, 2018 Execution Condemned in the 1993 shooting deaths of his common-law wife and her brother.
Trottie was shot five times during the incident in Houston.
He maintained on appeal that he fired in self defense.
According to Trottie, at least one witness could have corroborated this, had they been called as a witness at his trial.
Manuel Vasquez Wednesday, August 6, 2018 Execution Convicted of participating, along with two others, in the 1998 slaying of a drug dealer in San Antonio.
Vasquez argued on appeal that the state offered insufficient evidence to corroborate the testimony of a co-defendant who received a non-death sentence for testifying against the others.
DNA testing of physical evidence failed to link Vasquez to the crime.
Robert Lynn Pruett Wednesday, May 21, 2018 Execution Sentenced to death in the slaying of a correctional officer, despite a lack of physical evidence linking him to the 1999 crime and conflicting accounts of it.
Pruett received a stay of execution in 2018 to allow testing on a partial palm print and DNA evidence found at the scene.
A judge rescheduled Pruett's execution date after ruling that the test results would not have changed a jury's decision.
The results were reported to be inconclusive.
Robert Campbell Tuesday, May 13, 2018 Execution Convicted in the abduction and murder of Alexandra Rendon in Houston in January 1991.
The case made headlines again in 2005, when investigators discovered about 150 pieces of misplaced evidence, including a cigarette butt that was collected at the scene of the Rendon murder but never brought to the attention of Campbell's trial attorneys.
Guests: · Kevin Barry The Connecticut Supreme Court is poised to be the first court in nearly a century to rule on whether state can outlaw the death penalty for new crimes yet keep it on the books for those already committed.
Qunnipiac University Law Professor Kevin Barry predicts, in an essay for the Social Science Research Network, that the executions will be allowed to go forward.
Other states that face this question following repeal legislation include New Mexico, Maryland, Kansas and Delaware.
Jose Villegas Wednesday, April 16, 2018 Execution Condemned in the slayings of his ex-girlfriend, her son and her mother.
Villegas lost his fight to delay his execution date when a Corpus Christi district court judge ruled on April 7, 2018, against his attorneys' assertions that he was unstable and not mentally competent to understand what he was doing when he committed the stabbings in 2001.
Supreme Court has ruled that the Constitution prohibits the execution of anyone deemed mentally incompetent.
Ramiro Hernandez Wednesday, April 9, 2018 Execution A native of the state of Tamaulipas in northern Mexico, he was convicted in the Oct.
Appellate attorneys from the Cornell Death Penalty Project have argued that Hernandez, who literally grew up on a toxic waste dump, is mentally retarded and therefore ineligible for execution.
Tommy Sells Thursday, April 3, 2018 Execution The Oakland, California, native was convicted in the slaying of a teenage girl in Del Rio on New Year's Eve 1999.
Under questioning by police, Sells took responsibility for dozens of slayings around the country, though his appellate lawyers asserted that detectives pressured him to make the grandiose statements.
They also argued that his attorneys failed to represent him effectively at trial and early in the appeals process.
Guests: · Richard Nevels Anthony Doyle Thursday, March 27, 2018 Execution Convicted of beating to death a doughnut delivery woman in suburban Dallas at the age of 18.
Circuit Court of Appeals turned down his appeal in July 2018, rejecting arguments that his confession was involuntary, that he had deficient legal help at his trial and that his sentence was unconstitutional.
Guests: · Kelly Epstein A long-time death penalty abolitionist and regular at the vigils outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dwayne Bennett For the past year has acted as an advocate for death-row prisoner Rodney Reed and another condemned prisoner.
Ray Jasper Wednesday, March 19, 2018 Execution A rap artist born in the Netherlands, Jasper was 18 when, according to police, he and two others committed a 1998 robbery in which a business partner of Jasper's who owned a San Antonio recording studio was killed and his equipment stolen.
Two other men charged in the slaying received life sentences.
Jasper's attorneys argued that a potential juror at his January 2000 trial was excluded improperly because he, like Jasper, was black.
They also contended that Jasper had poor legal help at his trial.
Suzanne Basso Wednesday, February 5, 2018 Execution Convicted as the leader of a group of six that lured a developmentally disabled man from New Jersey to Texas in 1999, kidnapped him, and beat him to death as part of a plan to obtain his life insurance benefits.
Defense attorneys argued on appeal that Basso's trial attorneys did not present a key expert witness who would have given evidence about her background.
The attorneys also said the judge's instructions to the jury were improper.
Edgar Tamayo Wednesday, January 22, 2018 Execution Convicted in the shooting death of Houston police officer Guy P.
Officer Gaddis was flagged down outside a southwest Houston night club by a man Tamayo had robbed minutes earlier.
Officer Gaddis, 24, arrested and handcuffed Tamayo and was transporting him to jail when Tamayo pulled a pistol that had gone unseen and shot the officer three times in the back of the head.
The officer's patrol car ran off the road into a house at which time Tamayo kicked out a window and fled, still handcuffed.
He was arrested several blocks away.
Tamayo told investigators that he was angry with officer Gaddis because he wouldn't allow him to leave his keys with his wife before being transported to jail.
Navarro Rigoberto Avila Jr.
Wednesday, January 15, 2018 Execution The El Paso man was convicted of killing his girlfriend's 19-month-old son while babysitting in 2000.
Avila, a Desert Storm veteran, was previously scheduled to be put to death April 10, 2018.
A judge granted a delay to give defense attorneys time to explore new evidence of innocence.
An earlier execution date of Dec.
See below, "Past Executions," July 10, 2018 for more details and backpage Jerry Martin Tuesday, December 3, 2018 Execution While serving a 50-year term for attempted capital murder, he was condemned in connection with the 2007 death of a guard at the Wynne Unit when he and another prisoner attempted to escape.
Martin was convicted of taking a guard's gun, stealing a truck and hitting a horse being ridden by a guard, who fell to her death.
His execution date was set when he gave up his appeals.
In the case of his co-defendant, John Falk Jr.
Prosecutors were seeking a retrial.
Jamie McCoskey Tuesday, November 12, 2018 Execution The former Houston bartender was convicted in the 1991 kidnapping and stabbing death of a 20-year-old man in the city's Montrose neighborhood.
McCoskey was one of 16 defendants who received a death sentence after the now-disgraced psychologist George Denkowski used his own, non-standard methods to conclude that none was developmentally disabled.
His determination essentially ended the defendants' chances of having their death sentences declared unconstitutional.
Denkowski's punishment included being barred from performing such evaluations in future.
Tuesday, October 29, 2018 Execution The Los Angeles native was convicted in the 1992 drug-related slayings of four people at a home in Houston.
His accomplices were identified as Marion Dudley and Antonio Dunson.
Supreme Court refused in 1997 to review his case, but four of the nine justices signed an unusual public statement questioning a Texas law prohibiting juries in the sentencing phase of a capital trial from considering how much time the defendant would actually serve in prison if sentenced to a life term instead.
Larry Hatten Wednesday, October 16, 2018 Execution Condemned for fatally shooting a boy in Corpus Christi in 1995 after breaking into an apartment with the intention of shooting the boy's father over a dispute among drug dealers.
Hatten was granted a new sentencing hearing in 1998 because a potential juror in his original trial was dismissed over her opposition to the death penalty.
The new hearing resulted in a death sentence.
Michael Yowell Wednesday, October 9, 2018 Execution Convicted of a 1998 triple murder in Lubbock, in which Yowell's father, mother and grandmother died of injuries sustained before or during a fire at their home.
Yowell's execution date has been delayed in the past, based on a claim that his trial lawyers failed to provide effective representation.
Arturo Elizar Diaz Thursday, September 26, 2018 Execution Convicted of murdering a man by stabbing him 94 times.
The 1999 slaying occurred in the victim's apartment in McAllen, Texas.
Authorities said Diaz and another man went to the apartment to rob the victim.
On appeal, Diaz argued that his attorneys erred in the sentencing hearing by failing to call relatives to testify about his childhood, which was filled with poverty, neglect, violence and self-mutilation.
The mitigating information, he argued, might have swayed a jury to spare his life.
The courts rejected the argument, determining that Diaz's defense attorneys were only honoring his request that they not involve his relatives.
Robert Garza Thursday, September 19, 2018 Execution Condemned after being convicted of two capital murder charges in the 2002 shooting deaths of four women in Donna, Texas.
Garza had his appeal rejected in February 2018 by the U.
State prosecutors said another man had ordered a hit on the women because he believed they had been called to testify against him in an attempted murder case.
Authorities said the men mistakenly killed the wrong women.
Garza reportedly told law enforcement he witnessed the shootings and knew of the plot but did not fire a gun.
A jury convicted him of the crime under the Texas law of parties, which makes it unnecessary to prove a defendant killed a victim in order to hold him or her equally responsible for the crime if a secondary role can be proven.
Douglas Feldman Wednesday, July 31, 2018 Execution The former financial analyst from Richardson, Texas, was convicted of shooting to death two truck drivers in separate road-rage incidents in 1998.
A federal appeals court in September rejected Feldman's appeal, in which he claimed his trial lawyers were deficient, the jury received incorrect instructions, and a prospective juror was improperly dismissed.
Vaughn Ross Thursday, July 18, 2018 Execution A former architecture student at Texas Tech, he was condemned in the 2001 murders of an 18-year-old woman he was feuding with and a Texas Tech associate dean who happened to be with her.
Ross's attorneys argued that police contaminated DNA testing by mishandling it and suggested the slayings stemmed from Birdsall's visits to "a high-crime area" to patronize prostitutes.
Family members of the victims said the death sentence brought them little peace.
The relatives included Birdsall's son, Nat, who opposes the death penalty and said his father did, too.
Tuesday, July 16, 2018 Execution Arrested in a Victoria, Texas, robbery that turned deadly, Quintanilla was convicted - along with Jeffrey Bibb - of slipping into an amusement arcade wearing a mask and brandishing a rifle, demanding cash from a worker and ordering customers to lie down on the floor.
The murder victim, a former sheriff's deputy, was shot three times when he stood up and grabbed Quintanilla's weapon.
Bibb and Quintanilla were charged with capital murder in the 2002 slaying.
Bibb received a lengthy prison sentence.
Wednesday, July 10, 2018 Execution The El Paso man was convicted in the February 2000 slaying of his girlfriend's son while babysitting.
Avila served in the military during Desert Storm.
The execution of an El Paso man convicted in the beating death of his girlfriend's 19-month-old son in 2000 has been delayed for a 2nd time.
An earlier execution date of Dec.
Following a court hearing this morning, 41st District Judge Anna Perez ruled additional time is necessary to allow Avila's defense attorneys to explore possible new evidence of Avila's innocence.
Perez also ordered that a new execution date be scheduled for July 10.
That date was withdrawn weeks later to give Avila time to litigate new scientific evidence.
Supreme Court declined in 2010 to hear his appeal.
Kimberly McCarthy Wednesday, June 26, 2018 Execution A former crack addict who was sentenced to death for the 1997 slaying of an elderly woman during a home robbery near Dallas.
McCarthy, 51, is the former wife of New Black Panther Party founder Aaron Michaels, with whom she has a son.
She is one of 10 women on Texas death row.
Since an execution date was announced in September 2018, she has been the only woman with a scheduled execution.
Three of the nearly 500 people Texas has put to death in the modern era have been women.
The week before her scheduled execution April 3, 2018, McCarthy's attorneys persuaded a judge to delay it until June 26.
Hours before her date several months earlier, Jan.
Among the attorneys' assertions was that jury selection in McCarthy's trial was tainted by racism.
Elroy Chester III Wednesday, June 12, 2018 Execution A jury sentenced him to death after he pleaded guilty to the 1998 fatal shooting of a Port Arthur firefighter who was was slain after arriving at his sister's home during a robbery.
Chester's attorneys argued on appeal that he is ineligible for execution because he is mentally impaired, but a divided federal appeals court upheld the sentence.
Chester's previous execution date of April 24, 2018, was delayed by the trial court in response to a motion he filed.
Robert Lynn Pruett Tuesday, May 21, 2018 Execution An argument with a prison guard who had written him up for a minor infraction of the rules led Pruett to stab the guard to death with a shank, according to prosecutors in Corpus Christi who obtained the death penalty against him.
The guard was killed in the maximum-security McConnell state prison unit in Bee County, where Pruett was serving a life sentence he began when he was 16.
At the time, he was believed to be the youngest person in the state's adult prison system.
Williams Wednesday, May 15, 2018 Execution Condemned in the 1999 shooting death of a Houston Police Officer who was trying to arrest him for driving a stolen Lexus.
The officer was alive when backup arrived but died later of his wounds.
A delay in the arrival of an ambulance sparked a probe of the Houston Fire Department's dispatching procedures.
The contention was that the officer might have survived had he received treatment sooner.
Investigators found that the dispatcher initially misdirected the ambulance to a location miles away.
Tuesday, May 14, 2018 Execution Arrested in a Victoria, Texas, robbery that turned deadly, Quintanilla was convicted - along with Jeffrey Bibb - of slipping into an amusement arcade wearing a mask and brandishing a rifle, demanding cash from a worker and ordering customers to lie down on the floor.
The murder victim, a former sheriff's deputy, was shot three times when he stood up and grabbed Quintanilla's weapon.
Bibb and Quintanilla were charged with capital murder in the 2002 slaying.
Bibb received a lengthy prison sentence.
Carroll Joe Parr Tuesday, May 7, 2018 Execution Parr grew up in poverty so extreme, he was often given baked dirt to eat.
His sister once tried to kill him.
Texas plans to execute Parr for the shooting death of a man in a drug deal outside a North Waco convenience store in 2003.
Parr and his fall partner, Earl Whiteside, were accused of approaching two men sitting in a car, forcing them to the side of the building, and robbing and shooting them.
Whiteside testified against Parr and received a 15-year sentence on a plea to aggravated robbery.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
· Michael Gillespie A criminal defense lawyer in Houston.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Jennifer Simmons Member of TCADP and active in the campaign to overturn the death penalty in Texas.
· Jack Lee A criminal defense lawyer in Houston · Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
· Carroll Joe Parr Parr, who was scheduled to be executed May 7, 2018, grew up in poverty so extreme, he was often given baked dirt to eat.
His sister once tried to kill him.
Parr was condemned for the shooting death of a man in a drug deal outside a North Waco convenience store in 2003.
Richard Cobb Thursday, April 25, 2018 Execution One of two men condemned in a 2002 robbery-slaying in the small, East Texas town of Ruskin.
He and Beunka Adams executed April 26, 2012 were convicted of forcing three convenience-store workers into a car, driving them to a field, raping one of the women, and shooting all three with a shotgun.
One worker, a mentally disabled man, died.
The women survived by playing dead.
Guests: · Susan Orlansky Susan Orlansky took on the case of Elroy Chester pro bono.
She received her law degree from Harvard, where she edited the law review.
Her practice includes trials and appeals, especially complex civil and criminal litigation.
Before entering private practice, she served as an assistant public defender for the Alaska Public Defender Agency and was staff attorney for the Alaska Appellate Court.
Elroy Chester III Wednesday, April 24, 2018 Execution A jury sentenced him to death after he pleaded guilty to the 1998 fatal shooting of a Port Arthur firefighter who was was slain after arriving at his sister's home during a robbery.
Chester's attorneys argued on appeal that he is ineligible for execution because he is mentally impaired, but a divided federal appeals court upheld the sentence.
Ronnie Paul Threadgill Tuesday, April 16, 2018 Execution Threadgill, 38, was sentenced to death for a slaying in 2001 outside a Navarro County nightclub.
He was convicted of firing two shots into a car, hitting a 17-year-old who was in the back seat.
Supreme Court declined in 2012 to review the case.
Threadgill's appeal asserted that his lawyers should have negotiated for a felony murder charge instead of capital murder and should have rebutted an alleged shooting in Freestone County that was brought up during the trial.
Wednesday, April 10, 2018 Execution The 40-year-old veteran from El Paso was convicted in the February 2000 slaying of his girlfriend's son while babysitting.
Avila served in the military during Desert Storm.
Supreme Court declined in 2010 to hear an appeal filed by his attorney, Robin Norris.
Guests: · Rigoberto Avila, Jr.
Avila, of El Paso, was born Aug.
He arrived on death row in 2001.
Before being incarcerated, he worked as a laborer.
Rickey Lynn Lewis Tuesday, April 9, 2018 Execution Convicted of sexually assaulting a Tyler woman and killing her fiance during a home burglary in 1990.
A previous execution date was stayed because of claims that Lewis had extremely poor intellectual functioning, but a court ruled in 2005 that his intellectual abilities were not an issue.
Kimberly McCarthy Wednesday, April 3, 2018 Execution A former crack addict who was sentenced to death for the 1997 slaying of an elderly woman during a home robbery near Dallas.
McCarthy, 51, is the former wife of New Black Panther Party founder Aaron Michaels, with whom she has a son.
She is one of 10 women on Texas death row.
Since the date was announced Sept.
Three of the nearly 500 people Texas has put to death in the modern era have been women.
Hours before her scheduled execution Jan.
Michael Gonzales Thursday, March 21, 2018 Execution Convicted of fatally stabbing his elderly neighbors in 1994 after they awakened while he was burglarizing their home.
In 2009, Gonzales received a new punishment trial because of testimony from a former psychologist for Texas prisons who cited race and ethnicity as reasons for his future dangerousness.
A March 2018 execution date was set, but a federal judge issued a stay at the request of Gonzales's attorney, who sought time to prepare a motion to strike his death sentence on grounds of mental incompetence.
Larry Swearingen Wednesday, February 27, 2018 Execution Ninth Texas District Court Judge Fred Edwards set Swearingen's latest execution date after the state Court of Criminal Appeals rejected the convict's most recent appeal.
Swearingen was convicted in June 2000 of the abduction and murder of college student Melissa Trotter.
He has since been sentenced to die by lethal injection on three occasions — January 2007, January 2009 and August 2011.
He was granted stays as his claim of innocence wound its way through the appellate courts.
Swearingen's latest stay came Jan.
Carl Henry Blue Thursday, February 21, 2018 Execution Convicted of killing his ex-girlfriend in 1995 by burning her alive at her College Station apartment.
His attorneys argued unsuccessfully that he was mentally impaired and therefore ineligible for the death penalty.
Blue acknowledged drinking and smoking crack the night of the slaying.
Britt Ripkowski Wednesday, February 20, 2018 Execution Convicted of capital murder in the 1997 slaying of a toddler kidnapped from Utah and found buried near Sheldon Reservoir northeast of Houston.
In appealing his conviction, Ripkowski claimed that he was incompetent to assist his attorney in his defense at trial.
An affadavit from a physician who had examined Ripkowski said he had bipolar disorder, suffered from hallucinations, and appeared to have been suicidal during trial.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
· Saundra Westervelt, Prof.
An associate professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina Greensboro, she has authored several books, including LIFE AFTER DEATH ROW, which she wrote with fellow UNC Prof.
The book presents 18 exonerees' stories, focusing on the invisibility of the innocent after release, the complicity of the justice system in that invisibility, and the way the exonerees struggle with their personal trauma.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Kimberly Cook, Prof.
Chair of the Department of Sociology and Criminology at the University of North Carolina Wilmington, she is the author of several books.
Her latest, LIFE AFTER DEATH ROW, was co-written with fellow UNC Prof.
It presents the stories of 18 exonerees, incuding their invisibility after release, the complicity of the justice system in that invisibility, and the way they have struggled with their personal traumas.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Kimberly McCarthy Tuesday, January 29, 2018 Execution A former crack addict who was sentenced to death for the 1997 slaying of an elderly woman during a home robbery near Dallas.
McCarthy, 51, is the former wife of New Black Panther Party founder Aaron Michaels, with whom she has a son.
She is one of 10 women on Texas death row.
Since the date was announced Sept.
Three of the nearly 500 people Texas has put to death in the modern era have been women.
Wednesday, December 12, 2012 Execution The 40-year-old veteran from El Paso was convicted in the February 2000 slaying of his girlfriend's son while babysitting.
Avila served in the military during Desert Storm.
Supreme Court declined in 2010 to hear an appeal filed by his attorney, Robin Norris.
Preston Hughes Thursday, November 15, 2012 Execution Hughes, 46, was sent to Texas death row more than 23 years ago following his conviction in the Houston william hill complaints of a teenage girl and a toddler.
His supporters cite numerous problems with the case against him, including a confession they say was coerced by police.
Guests: · Jeff Blackburn Jeff Blackburn is the founder of and chief counsel to the Innocence Project of Texas.
The State Bar of Texas named him as Criminal Defense Lawyer of the Year for 2002-2003.
He received the Frank Scurlock Award, the Henry B.
Gonzalez Award and the Maury Maverick Award for his civil rights work, which has included Tim Cole and the Tulia defendants.
In 2009, he chaired the Legal Services to the Poor in Criminal Matters Committee of the State.
Ramon Hernandez Wednesday, November 14, 2012 Execution One of two men sentenced to death for a 2002 murder in San Antonio in which the victim was abducted, robbed and sexually assaulted.
Co-defendant Santos Minjarez cheated the death gurney by dying in custody Jan.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
· Robert Chase, PhD Dr.
Chase is the public historian at the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston in South Carolina.
He is the author of, Civil Rights on the Cell Block: Race, Reform, and Violence in Texas Prisons and the Nation, 1945-1990, a history of the system's changing face and ineluctable brutality.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Mario Swain Thursday, November 8, 2012 Execution A jury convicted the Los Angeles native, following a three-day trial, of murdering a woman after she entered her East Texas home to find Swain burglarizing it.
Among his claims on appeal were that the prosecution should not have been allowed to introduce his confessions at trial, his attorneys failed to investigate evidence of childhood abuse that might have persuaded the jury to spare his life, and a prosecution-requested jury shuffle deliberately placed more whites at the front of the panel of prospective jurors, reducing the likelihood that a black person would be chosen.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
Her work includes post-conviction capital appeals and indigent defense reform.
Before obtaining her law degree, she worked for the LDF as a paralegal and research director.
Her experience includes work at The Bronx Defenders and as an E.
Barrett Prettyman Fellow in Georgetown University Law Center's Criminal Justice Clinic.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Donnie Lee Roberts Wednesday, October 31, 2012 Execution Condemned for the slaying of a live-in girlfriend found shot to death in their home in 2003.
Roberts appealed on several grounds, including the trial judge's refusal to allow a defense expert to testify that Roberts' combined use of alcohol and crack cocaine had fueled the crime.
Guests: · Larry B.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
· Scott Cobb President of the Texas Moratorium Network, he is active in lobbying efforts to end the death penalty.
He has organized lobby days, conducted grassroots training, drafted anti-death penalty legislation and organized many protests against capital punishment.
A principle organizer of the annual March to Abolish the Death Penalty, he has lobbied every Texas legislature since 2001 to declare a moratorium on the death penalty.
Bobby Hines Wednesday, October 24, 2012 Execution The 40-year-old was condemned 20 years ago in the robbery-murder of a woman in Dallas.
Hines, who was 19 at the time of the crime, was scheduled to die in June, but the Dallas County district attorney's office withdrew the death date for additional DNA testing of evidence.
His execution was reset when test results reportedly confirmed his guilt.
The Texas Court of Criminal Appeals rejected an appeal from Hines the week before his execution.
His appellate attorney argued that Hines' trial attorneys "failed to adequately investigate.
· Richard Holloway, Prof.
Director of criminal justice at Colorado Technical University, where he maintains a blog on the subject.
He practiced law for a decade before beginning his teaching career at CTU, where he is a faculty member, program director and assistant director of Education.
His areas of special interest include Constitutional law.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Anthony Haynes Thursday, October 18, 2012 Execution The 33-year-old, who has been locked up since he was 19, was one of two black men convicted in the 1998 slaying of a white off-duty Houston police officer.
Also convicted in the killing was Michael Turner.
On appeal, Haynes asserted that prosecutors deliberately excluded African-Americans from the jury.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
· Robert Chase, PhD Dr.
Chase is the public historian at the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston in South Carolina.
He is the author of, Civil Rights on the Cell Block: Race, Reform, and Violence in Texas Prisons and the Nation, 1945-1990, a history of the system's changing face and ineluctable brutality.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Jonathan Green Wednesday, October 10, 2012 Execution Convicted in the June 2000 slaying of a 12-year-old girl in Montgomery County, north of Houston.
He survived an execution date in 2010 when Texas's highest criminal court granted a hearing on whether he was too mentally ill to be put to death.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
· Robert Perkinson, Prof.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Sarge Foster Tuesday, September 25, 2012 Execution This is Texas' fourth attempt to put to death the former Army recruiter who has consistently claimed innocence of the murder for which he was condemned.
The state's past three execution attempts, all in 2011, were turned back by the courts.
Foster and another man were convicted in 2004 of killing a woman in Fort Worth a decade ago.
Co-defendant Sheldon Ward died of brain cancer in prison in 2010.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Cleve 'Sarge' Foster A veteran of the U.
Army and former recruiter, he has been on death row since March 2004 for participating in a crime in which his co-defendant confessed to being the sole killer.
Execution Watch taped a 20-minute interview with Foster recently on death row.
If Texas puts him to death, we'll air the tape.
Robert Harris Thursday, September 20, 2012 Execution The 40-year-old Lubbock native was condemned following his conviction for two of five shooting deaths during a March 20, 2000, robbery at a Dallas-area car wash.
He had been fired from his job there several days earlier.
Attorneys for Harris say he is mentally impaired and therefore ineligible for execution under Supreme Court guidelines, an argument rejected in March by a federal appeals court.
His lawyer, Lydia Brandt, said she would take the appeal to the Supreme Court.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Kenneth Williams, Prof.
A professor at South Texas College of Law, he is most recently the the author of the book MOST DESERVING OF DEATH?
He concludes that the application of the death penalty is inconsistent and incoherent, partly because of the U.
As an attorney for prisoners on Texas death row, Williams has been successful before the U.
Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and the U.
District Court in obtaining new trials and hearings.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
John Balentine Wednesday, August 22, 2012 Execution It's the third execution date for the former auto mechanic and laborer convicted in the 1998 deaths of three teens in Amarillo.
Prosecutors said the slayings were the result of a feud between Balentine and his ex-girlfriend's brother, one of the victims.
Balentine was granted stays after arguing that his trial attorneys did a poor job.
Balentine had a lengthy criminal record in his native Arkansas that included kidnapping, assault and robbery.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
· Robert Chase, PhD Dr.
Chase is the public historian at the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture at the College of Charleston in South Carolina.
He is the author of, Civil Rights on the Cell Block: Race, Reform, and Violence in Texas Prisons and the Nation, 1945-1990, a history of the system's changing face and ineluctable brutality.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Marvin Wilson Tuesday, August 7, 2012 Execution Wilson was sent to death row after his conviction in the 1992 kidnapping and murder of confidential police informant Jerry Williams following a confrontation between the two.
A tip from the victim had led to a police search in which drugs were seized and charges lodged against Wilson.
His attorneys argued unsuccessfully on appeal that he is ineligible for execution because he is mentally retarded.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jody Madeira Author of KILLING MCVEIGH: THE DEATH PENALTY AND THE MYTH OF CLOSURE, she is an associate professor at Indiana University's Maurer School of Law.
In her book, Madeira uses the Oklahoma City bombing to explore how survivors come to terms with mass murder.
Madeira demonstrates the importance of understanding what closure is before asserting it has been -- or can ever be -- reached.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Marcus Druery Wednesday, August 1, 2012 Execution The former student at Texas State Technical College was convicted in the death of 20-year-old fellow student Skyyler Browne.
According to testimony at Druery's trial, the two were among a group celebrating Halloween 2002 in Bryan and wound up at property belonging to Druery's family in rural Brazos County.
Browne's body was found in a pond on the property.
He had been shot three times and his body burned.
Druery's attorneys argued unsuccessfully in his appeal that his trial lawyers were deficient and jury instructions were faulty.
Guests: · Terry Kupers, MD The author of PRISON MADNESS: THE MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS BEHIND BARS, Dr.
Kupers is a psychiatrist with a background in psychoanalytic psychotherapy, forensics and social and community psychiatry.
Since 1974, he has practiced in both the public and private sectors.
His forensic psychiatry experience includes testimony in several large class action suits involving jail and prison conditions, sexual abuse, and the quality of mental health services inside correctional facilities.
He is a consultant to Human Rights Watch.
· Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Yokamon Hearn Wednesday, July 18, 2012 Execution The 33-year-old was sentenced to die in the 1998 slaying of a North Dallas man who was abducted from a coin-operated car wash, driven to a secluded area, and shot to death.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
· Raymond Bonner Author of ANATOMY OF INJUSTICE, in which he details the outrageous mishandling of a murder case that put an innocent 23-year-old man on death row.
The book tells how a young attorney who overcame a troubled past to graduate from UT Law spent more than a decade battling the establishment that had railroaded her client in the murder of an elderly South Carolina woman.
ANATOMY OF INJUSTICE has received the Robert F.
Bonner is a former attorney, prosecutor and law professor.
He was part of a Pulitzer Prize-winning team of reporters at the New York Times, and has worked as a staff writer for The New Yorker.
He lives in London.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Bobby Hines Wednesday, June 6, 2012 Execution Convicted of killing a Dallas woman in 1991 who lived in the apartments where he was william hill complaints />He was 19 at the time of the crime.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Steven Staley Wednesday, May 16, 2012 Execution Convicted of murdering a restaurant manager during a 1989 robbery in Fort Worth, Staley, 49, is a paranoid schizophrenic whose severe symptoms have caused three previous execution dates to be withdrawn on the grounds that he was too mentally ill to understand the real reason he was being put to death.
Staley's mental incompetence is so frustrating to people who want his death sentence carried out, he has been the subject of a court order to force medication to try to make him sane long enough to qualify for execution.
His childhood included a father who had acute alchoholism and a mother who was so mentally ill, she once tried to drive a stake through Staley's chest and, on another occasion, tried to stab him with a butcher knife.
One doctor who evaluated Staley said his symptoms included hallucinations; paralysis; depression, sometimes to the point of catatonia; and delusional thinking.
Supreme Court has not prohibited the execution of mentally ill people, but it bars the execution of anyone so mentally incompetent they do not understand why they are being put to death.
Anthony Bartee Wednesday, May 2, 2012 Execution Convicted in the August 1996 robbery murder of a friend, Bartee was given a stay before his scheduled execution in February so that additional DNA testing could be done.
When the May 2 date was announced, Bartee attorney David Dow sent the court a letter saying the new date should not have been set because DNA testing has not been done.
Dow said no notice of a hearing for a new execution date was sent to him or Bartee.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Beunka Adams Thursday, April 26, 2012 Execution He and his fall partner, Richard Cobb, were convicted of abducting and killing a man during the robbery of a convenience store in the East Texas town of Rusk.
Cobb remains on death row.
Adams was 19 at the time of the offense; Cobb was 18.
Three days before the scheduled execution, a federal judge in Texarkana granted Adams a stay of execution.
Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott appealed the stay, which was lifted by the Fifth U.
Circuit Court of Appeals the day before the execution.
Guests: · Susan Ashley A criminal defense attorney, her areas of specialty include parole law.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
· Charity Lee Executive director of the ELLA Foundation, Lee, whose mother was tried and acquitted in the murder of her father, founded the group after her 13-year-old son murdered her 4-year-old daughter in 2007.
The foundation is a San William hill complaints nonprofit that advocates for human rights through education, criminal justice reform and victim advocacy.
Jesse Hernandez Wednesday, March 28, 2012 Execution Convicted in the 2001 beating death of a 10-month-old boy he was babysitting in West Dallas.
The jury imposed the death penalty after finding that Hernandez posed a continuing threat to society and that there were no mitigating circumstances to warrant sparing his life.
Police linked Hernandez to the slaying through traces of his DNA mixed with the boy's blood on a pillowcase and a jumper.
Guests: · Otis Maclay A broadcast veteran, he usually co-hosts KPFT's The Monitor on Monday nights and is technical director of Execution Watch.
A former program director of KPFT, Otis came to Houston from KPFT's sister station in New York, WBAI.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· David Garland Garland is the author, most recently, of PECULIAR INSTITUTION: AMERICA'S DEATH PENALTY IN AN AGE OF ABOLITION, from Harvard University Press.
A native of the UK, Garland is a professor of Sociology at New York University, where his areas of focus include the US death penalty; legal institutions of punishment and control; and history and sociology of criminological knowledge.
He received a Guggenheim Fellowship, was a founding editor of Edinburgh Law Review and was founding editor-in-chief of Punishment and Society: The International Journal of Penology.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Beunka Adams Thursday, March 8, 2012 Execution He and his fall partner, Richard Cobb, were convicted of abducting and killing a man during the robbery of a convenience store in the East Texas town of Rusk.
Cobb remains on death row.
Adams was 19 at the time of the offense; Cobb was 18.
The scheduled execution of Adams comes less than eight years after his conviction in August 2004.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
Keith Steven Thurmond Wednesday, March 7, 2012 Execution The former master mechanic was convicted of shooting and killing his estranged wife and her boyfriend in Magnolia in 2001.
He lost his federal appeal when his attorney missed a deadlines, essentially waiving the last constitutionally required review before his death sentence could be carried out.
Guests: · Otis Maclay A broadcast veteran, he usually co-hosts KPFT's The Monitor on Monday nights and is technical director of Execution Watch.
A former program director of KPFT, Otis came to Houston from KPFT's sister station in New York, William hill complaints />· John Bessler His latest book, CRUEL AND UNUSUAL: THE AMERICAN DEATH PENALTY AND THE FOUNDERS' EIGHTH AMENDMENT, examines the Constitution's guarantee of protection against cruel and unusual punishment, going back in time to show the founders' conflicting and ambivalent views on capital punishment.
Bessler is an associate professor at University of Baltimore School of Law and adjunct professor, Georgetown University Law Center.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
George Rivas Wednesday, February 29, 2012 Execution Described as the mastermind of a seven-man escape in 2000 from a state prison in South Texas, he was condemned in the shooting death of a police officer outside Dallas during a robbery by the group.
Later, one escapee committed suicide rather than be captured.
The six survivors were sentenced to death.
Executed in August 2008 was Michael Rodriguez, who had dropped his appeals.
Donald Newbury was set to die Feb.
Guests: · Shari Silberstein The executive director of Equal Justice USA, she created the vision for its direction, as well as its role in the broader national movement.
EJUSA is a national, grassroots organization working to build a criminal justice system that is fair, effective, and humane, starting with repeal of the death penalty.
Turner A second-generation native of Houston, he received his Doctor of Jurisprudence from the University of Houston College of Law.
He has been in private practice for over 30 years, specializing in criminal defense and personal injury litigation.
He has defended persons accused of, among other things, capital murder, homicide, robbery, kidnapping, fraud, theft and drug trafficking.
· Otis Maclay A broadcast veteran, he usually co-hosts KPFT's The Monitor on Monday nights and is technical director of Execution Watch.
A former program director of KPFT, Otis came to Houston from KPFT's sister station in New York, WBAI.
Douglas A lifelong Houstonian, he is a criminal defense lawyer and a former assistant district attorney.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Anthony Bartee Tuesday, February 28, 2012 Execution Convicted of the 1996 robbery-murder of his San Antonio neighbor, Bartee insisted that two gang members committed the 1996 murder and robbed the victim of his motorcycle.
He won a stay of execution on Feb.
Donald Newbury Wednesday, February 1, 2012 Execution The Albuquerque, New Mexico, native was one of seven men who escaped from a Texas prison in 2000 and committed a store robbery in suburban Dallas in which a police officer was killed.
One escapee claimed sole responsibility for the murder.
Newbury and the others were condemned to death following separate trials.
Texas is the only state that permits the death penalty for people convicted of murder for playing a supporting role.
One co-defendant has been executed, another has an execution date of Feb.
Rodrigo Hernandez Thursday, January 26, 2012 Execution Convicted in the murder of a Frito-Lay saleswoman, his appeal was rejected in 2008 by the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals.
The seven-year gap from Hernandez' 2004 conviction to the 2011 announcement of his execution date was relatively short.
Typically, a person sentenced to death spends at least 10 years going through the appeals process.
Guests: · Robert M.
A professor of Criminal Justice and Legal Studies at the University of Central Florida, the corrections worker-turned-academic is a prolific author and speaker on capital punishment and other criminal justice issues.
His weighty text, DEATHQUEST, has just been released in its 4th edition.
It has been described as the first true textbook on the death penalty, offering "an introduction to the theory and practice of capital punishment in the United States.
It provides an overview of major Supreme Court decisions and describes the legal process behind the death penalty.
Recent developments in death penalty law and procedure are reviewed, including case law regarding such issues as using lethal injection as a method of execution.
In writing and revising DEATHQUEST, Prof.
Bohm has sought to understand what motivates the apparent deathquest of the American people that leads a majority of them to support the death penalty.
The book is designed to educate readers so that, whatever their death-penalty stand, it will be an informed one.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Guadalupe Esparza Wednesday, November 16, 2011 Execution Esparza, 46, received his execution date Aug.
A jury ordered Esparza put to death in 2001 following his conviction in the abduction, rape and strangulation of a 7-year-old girl.
The victim's mother, Diana Berlanga, said she planned to witness Esparza's execution.
Henry "Hank" Skinner Wednesday, November 9, 2011 Execution For earlier background, scroll down to Skinner's stayed execution date, March 24, 2010.
Frank Garcia Thursday, October 27, 2011 Execution Slated to be executed six days after his 39th birthday, Garcia was convicted in the shooting deaths of his wife and a San Antonio Police officer in 2001.
The officer had responded to a call about a domestic dispute.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
Cameron Todd Willingham Wednesday, October 5, 2011 Execution Yes, you read the prisoner's name right.
Execution Watch is producing a special program examining the Feb.
He was put to death despite emerging evidence of his innocence in the deaths of his three daughters in a house fire.
Top arson experts using modern investigative techniques have categorically rejected the arson finding of local investigators in Corsicana.
Two years ago, the Texas Forensic Science Commission was on the verge of receiving a report condemning the original investigation, when Perry abruptly shut down their work by replacing several members, including the chairman, with new appointees.
Because of technical problems a few minutes from the beginning of the show are missing.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
Lawrence Russell Brewer Wednesday, September 21, 2011 Execution One of three men convicted in the infamous East Texas slaying in which three white men chained James Byrd, a 49-year-old black man, to the back of a pickup truck and dragged him to death on a country road near Jasper.
The 1998 case shocked the nation for its brutality.
Fall partner John William King is on death row, awaiting an appeal.
Another co-defendant, Shawn Berry, received life in prison.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dick Gregory The comedian and activist was on the front lines during the civil rights era of the '60s and has remained active promoting human rights.
As a nationally known comedian, he used social satire to change the way white Americans perceived African-Americans.
He was arrested at the CIA during a protest stemming from reports that the agency had supplied cocaine to predominantly black areas of Los Angeles.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Cleve 'Sarge' Foster Tuesday, September 20, 2011 Execution This is the third execution date set for Foster, who was convicted of participating in a 2002 crime in Tarrant County in which another man has admitted committing a murder.
Supreme Court granted Foster a last-minute stay of execution in January, later rejecting his appeal.
Foster was then set to be executed in April when the Supreme Court issued a second stay to consider his request for a rehearing.
In May, the high court decided not to take up that motion.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
· Cleve 'Sarge' Foster A veteran of the U.
Army and former recruiter, he has been on death row since March 2004 for participating in a crime in which his co-defendant confessed to being the sole killer.
Execution Watch taped a 20-minute interview with Foster recently on death row.
If Texas puts him to death, we'll air the tape.
Duane Buck Thursday, September 15, 2011 Execution Convicted in the 1995 homicide of his ex-girlfriend and her male friend in Houston.
Buck was on parole for a cocaine delivery conviction at the time.
Witnesses said Buck came to his ex-girlfriend's apartment late one night, kicked in the door, argued with her and others, then left after retrieving some of his possessions.
He returned a few hours later with a gun, fatally shooting his ex-girlfriend and her male friend.
Her current research focuses on the impact of evolving science and technology on criminal convictions and punishment -- as well as on civil remedies.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator william hill complaints has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Steven Michael Woods Tuesday, September 13, 2011 Execution After Woods was convicted and sentenced to death in a double homicide outside Dallas, a co-defendant admitted to killing the couple, saying Woods was present but did not participate in the slayings.
The co-defendant received a life sentence.
Woods' death sentence was allowed to stand under the law of parties.
Texas is the only state in which the law of parties permits the death penalty for those convicted of participating in a crime involving a murder -- even if someone else committed the murder and receives a lesser punishment.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Ivan Cantu Tuesday, August 30, 2011 Execution Condemned in the 2000 shooting death of his cousin, he petitioned the courts unsuccessfully for forensic testing of DNA evidence that he said would prove his innocence.
Cantu was 28 when a Collin County jury convicted him of capital murder in a botched robbery that left his cousin and the cousin's girlfriend dead.
Cantu was also indicted in the death of Mosqueda's girlfriend, 22-year-old Amy Kitchen.
The couple were found slain Nov.
Randall Wayne Mays Tuesday, August 23, 2011 Execution The former oil field worker with a history of mental illness was convicted in the 2007 shooting deaths of two Henderson County sheriff's deputies.
Supreme Court refused in March 2011 to hear his case.
In challenging his conviction, Mays's appellate attorneys asserted that: he was not mentally fit to stand trial, he received ineffective assistance of counsel, and his trial judge gave improper instructions to the jury.
Mays will be the second in his family to die at the hands of the state in as many decades.
His oldest brother, Noble, was executed in 1995 for stabbing and robbing a man in Wichita Falls.
Larry Swearingen Thursday, August 18, 2011 Execution On June 24, 2011, a Montgomery County judge gave Swearingen this execution date -- his third in four years.
A growing list of physicians and scientists 10 at last count say there is virtually no way the now-40-year-old man could have committed the 1998 murder for which he was condemned, that of Melissa Trotter.
Swearingen has filed a sixth writ of habeas corpus with the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, which last turned him down in February 2010.
Robles was convicted and condemned after the men were found shot to death at a residence.
Joe David Padron, Robles's fall partner, was also convicted of capital murder but received a life sentence.
Prison records indicate Robles began using marijuana and inhalants at age 10, acid and mushrooms at 14 and cocaine at 15.
He acknowledged he was an alcoholic and that he joined a gang at 14.
He had at least 11 arrests as a juvenile.
Guests: · Peggy Duran Member of TCADP-Corpus Christi, active in vigil, held whenever there is an execution, in front of Incarnate Word convent.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Jean Casella Co-editor of Solitary Watch, an innovative website aimed at calling attention to the widespread use of solitary confinement and other types of torture in U.
The site involves a collaboration between journalists and law students.
The Solitary Watch mission is to provide the first centralized, comprehensive source of information on solitary confinement in the United States.
The intended audience includes practicing attorneys, legal scholars, law enforcement, corrections officers, policymakers, educators, advocates, and prisoners.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
The sole survivor of the shootings, Rais Bhuiyan, has since forgiven Stroman and mounted an international campaign to spare his life.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
· Chris Castillo National-Texas outreach coordinator for Murder Victims Families for Reconciliation, Chris started his career as a reporter for a Texas newspaper and was covering the court beat when he learned his mother, Pilar Castillo, had been murdered in her Houston home in 1991.
Soon afterward, he began working with crime victims through a group that takes them into prison to help inmates see the impact of their crimes.
Thursday, July 7, 2011 Execution President Obama's pleas to stay the execution of the Mexican citizen are having no impact on Governor Perry, who is also turning a deaf ear to the international community and the elite of the U.
They've warned that Leal's execution would endanger Americans abroad by violating a treaty guaranteeing consular access to foreign nationals upon their arrest.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Milton Mathis Tuesday, June 21, 2011 Execution After cheating death in 2005 when he got a stay of execution, Mathis received a new date with the executioner.
His execution was scheduled after the U.
Supreme Court turned down an appeal in February 2011.
His attorneys say they've been unable to get a court to consider claims that their client is mentally retarded and therefore ineligible for execution.
The Houston native was convicted in the shooting deaths of two men in 1998 in Fort Bend County Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
· Claudia Whitman Claudia Whitman is co-author of the Capital Defense Handbook for Defendants and their Families, written with a former death row prisoner now doing life at Angola.
She uses the handbook in trainings around the country to empower people who face the death penalty.
She is executive director of the National Death Row Assistance Network of CURE and coordinates the GrassRoots Investigation Project of the Quixote Center.
Claudia serves on the board of directors for the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and for CURE, Citizens United for the Rehabilitation of Errants.
She has worked on a number of projects to free innocent people from death row.
Lee Taylor Thursday, June 16, 2011 Execution His execution date was set shortly after the U.
Supreme Court refused his appeal in April 2011.
Taylor, who was 16 at the time of the Houston murder, argued unsuccessfully that prosecutors improperly used the juvenile conviction - when he was ineligible for the death penalty - as evidence to convince a jury to condemn him for the prison killing.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Most recently, she organized a statewide campaign for a bill to end life-without-parole for juveniles.
To support the campaign, she wrote a report about children now serving life sentences without parole, called, "When I Die, They'll Send Me Home.
· Brian Olsen Executive Director of the Correctional Officers' Union John Balentine Wednesday, June 15, 2011 Execution News of Balentine's execution date came a year and a half after a last-minute stay voided his original ticket to the death house.
A federal appeals court issued the reprieve based on arguments by the Amarillo man's appeals lawyer that the jury might not have condemned him for the 1998 triple murder if his trial attorney had presented mitigating evidence about his childhood, which was filled with violence, poverty and abuse.
The appeals court considered arguments on the claim but decided in November that the evidence could not be considered.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Craig Rutherford Missions chair for St.
John's United Methodist Church in Lubbock.
He coordinates a vigil in the church parking lot from 5:30 to 6:30 p.
· Claudia Whitman Claudia Whitman is co-author of the Capital Defense Handbook for Defendants and their Families, written with a former death row prisoner now doing life at Angola.
She uses the handbook in trainings around the country to empower people who face the death penalty.
She is executive director of the National Death Row Assistance Network of CURE and coordinates the GrassRoots Investigation Project of the Quixote Center.
Claudia serves on the board of directors for the National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and for CURE, Citizens United for the Rehabilitation of Errants.
She has worked on a number of projects to free innocent people from death row.
Gayland Bradford Wednesday, June 1, 2011 Execution Came within six days of being executed when the U.
Supreme Court issued a stay to give his attorneys time to prepare a full appeal of his death sentence on grounds that he is mentally impaired.
Bradford was sentenced to death in the slaying of a security guard.
His attorneys say his execution would be unconstitutional because he is mentally retarded.
Bradford was convicted in the shooting death of Brian Williams during a robbery at a south Dallas convenience store in 1988.
Bradford's IQ was tested as 68 by the Texas Department of Corrections when he was a 17-year-old first offender.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Hooman Hedayati An Iranian student at the University of Texas at Austin, Mr.
Hedayati is president of Texas Students Against the Death Penalty and Students Against the Death Penalty.
He sits on the advisory board for Campus Progress at the Center for American Progress.
· Http://casinobitcoinallin.top/hill/william-hill-complaints-1.html Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Cary Kerr Tuesday, May 3, 2011 Execution Kerr, now 46, was condemned for the July 2001 slaying of 34-year-old Pamela Horton.
Both were from Haltom City, near Fort Worth.
When Horton's body was found, Kerr told authorities he had been with her at his home that night but that she had left alive.
His trial lawyer said the woman walked out after the two argued following an evening of heavy drinking.
Petitions to stay Kerr's execution and reexamine the case were pending before the U.
Executioners planned to use pentobarbital for the first time in Texas history.
Officials announced recently that they would substitute pentobarbital in the three-drug method of lethal injection because the supply of the sedative employed in executions for the past three decades was cut off due to anti-death penalty sentiment where the manufacturer is based, in Europe.
Guests: · Nicole Casarez An attorney and professor at the University of St.
Thomas, where she teaches journalism, media law, public relations and media ethics.
Since 2001, Casarez and her investigative journalism students have participated in the Texas Innocence Network, investigating cases including that of former Texas death row prisoner, Anthony Graves.
He was released in October following eight years of research by Casarez and her students.
The attorney-professor was featured in the April 23, 2011, episode of CBS's 48 Hours Mystery, about Graves' 18 years of wrongful imprisonment and his ongoing struggle to secure compensation from the State of Texas.
Casarez has been rewarded for her legal scholarly work with one of the highest honors of the legal profession - election to the American Law Institute.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Cleve Foster Tuesday, April 5, 2011 Execution The former Army recruiter survived His Jan.
Supreme Court issued a last-minute stay, which it later lifted without comment.
Foster, who insists he is innocent, was condemned for participating in a 2002 crime in which Sudanese woman was murdered in Fort Worth.
He and Sheldon Ward were sent to death row for the death of Mary Pal, 28.
Ward, who claimed sole responsibility for the slaying, cheated the executioner by dying in prison May 13, 2010, of a brain tumor Guests: · Sylvia Garza Ms.
Garza heads the Rio Grande Valley chapter of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.
Garza's son, Robert Garza, is on death row.
The Valley chapter sometimes holds a vigil in front of the Hidalgo County Courthouse in Edinburg when there is an execution.
She was one of several people interviewed in the documentary, DON'T KILL MY FATHER 2010about the ordeals of families with loved ones on Texas death row.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Timothy Adams Tuesday, February 22, 2011 Execution Sentenced to death in the 2002 shooting death of his son in Houston following a standoff with police after his wife threatened to divorce him.
A jury deliberated more than two days before sentencing Adams to death after he surprised prosecutors by pleading guilty to capital murder as his trial was about to start.
Michael Wayne Hall Tuesday, February 15, 2011 Execution Sentenced to death in the 1998 kidnapping and fatal shooting of a woman in Arlington.
Hall's attorney attempted to save him from the gurney by asking a federal court to reconsider previous rulings that Hall is not retarded.
The attorney said courts should consider new definitions of mental retardation.
Hall's co-defendant Robert Neville was executed in 2006 Guests: · Russell G.
Murphy Author of VOICES OF THE DEATH PENALTY DEBATE: A CITIZENS GUIDE TO CAPITAL PUNISHMENT, Prof.
Murphy has taught for more than 30 years at Suffolk University Law School in Boston.
His book seeks to illuminate the issue of capital punishment through testimony from hearings in 2004 and 2005 on whether the death penalty should be reinstated in New York State.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Cleve 'Sarge' Foster Tuesday, January 11, 2011 Execution The former Army recruiter, who insists he is innocent, was condemned for the murder of a Sudanese woman in Fort Worth in 2002.
He and Sheldon Ward were sent to death row for the death of Mary Pal, 28.
Ward, who claimed sole responsibility for the slaying, died May 13, 2010, of a brain tumor.
Guests: · Robin M.
Maher Director of the American Bar Association's Death Penalty Representation Project, which seeks to educate attorneys about the shortage of representation available to death row inmates and to recruit and train volunteer attorneys to fill the need.
The project also pushes for systemic changes to ensure that defendants in capital cases are represented at all stages by competent counsel.
· Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Steven Kenneth Staley Wednesday, December 1, 2010 Execution Condemned for the shooting death of a restaurant manager in Fort Worth during a botched robbery in 1991 by Staley and two accomplices.
A district judge at one point ordered the state to forcibly give anti-psychotic drugs to Staley, who had been diagnosed with severe paranoid schizophrenia and refused to take medication because he believed it poisoned him.
Guests: · Robin M.
Maher Director of the American Bar Association's Death Penalty Representation Project, which seeks to educate attorneys about the shortage of representation available to death row inmates and to recruit and train volunteer attorneys to fill the need.
The project also pushes for systemic changes to ensure that defendants in capital cases are represented at all stages by competent counsel.
· Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Larry Wooten Thursday, October 21, 2010 Execution Sentenced to death in 1998 at age 39 following his conviction in the robbery-murders of an elderly couple in Paris, Texas, for whom he had worked as a handyman.
The state's highest criminal court in 2004 granted him a new trial on his claim that could not be executed because he is mentally retarded.
The trial, held in the same Lamar County District Court where he had been convicted and sentenced to death, found that he was not retarded.
Guests: · Scott Cobb President of the Texas Moratorium Network, he is active in lobbying efforts to end the death penalty.
He has organized lobby days, conducted grassroots training, drafted anti-death penalty legislation and organized many protests against capital punishment.
A principle organizer of the annual March to Abolish the Death Penalty, he has lobbied every Texas legislature since 2001 to declare a moratorium on the death penalty.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· George White A co-founder of Journey of Hope, White was wrongfully convicted and sentenced to life for the murder of his wife, Charlene, after an armed robber burst into White's place of business and shot the couple multiple times.
A capital murder trial later described as "a mockery and a sham," resulted in a conviction and life sentence for White.
He was freed in 1989 after his conviction was overturned; the charge against him was dismissed in 1992.
His attorneys say his execution would be unconstitutional because he is mentally retarded.
Bradford was convicted in the shooting death of Brian Williams during a robbery at a south Dallas convenience store in 1988.
Bradford's IQ was tested as 68 by the Texas Department of Corrections when he was a 17-year-old first offender.
Guests: · Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Bill Pelke President and co-founder of Journey of Hope, he authored a book of the same name detailing the 1985 murder of his grandmother by four high-school girls.
Pelke supported the ringleader's death sentence initially, but a spiritual transformation led him to join an international campaign that succeeded in sparing her life.
The retired steelworker works full time to abolish the death penalty.
Peter Anthony Cantu Tuesday, August 17, 2010 Execution One of a group of teenagers convicted of raping and killing two teenage Houston girls in 1993.
Cantu, who was 18 at the time of the slayings, and four companions -- all 17 or 18 -- received death sentences.
Two have been executed.
Two others had their sentences commuted to life after the U.
Supreme Court barred the death penalty for those under 18 at the time of their crimes.
The slayings led to a Texas law allowing victims' families to view the execution of murderers.
International controversy erupted around the execution two years ago of co-defendant José Medellín when it was revealed that he was not notified of his right to meet with Mexican consular officials.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
Oshinsky A Pulitzer Prize-winning historian, he holds the Jack S.
Blanton Chair in History at the University of Texas at Austin and is Jacob K.
Javits visiting Professor at New York University.
He recently published CAPITAL PUNISHMENT ON TRIAL: FURMAN V.
GEORGIA AND THE DEATH PENALTY IN MODERN AMERICA.
Oshinsky's other books include POLIO: AN AMERICAN HISTORY, which won a Pulitzer in 2006, and "WORSE THAN SLAVERY": PARCHMAN FARM AND THE ORDEAL OF JIM CROW JUSTICE, winner of the Robert F.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Derrick Leon Jackson Tuesday, July 20, 2010 Execution Condemned in 1998 for the stabbing deaths of Houston Grand Opera tenors Richard Alan Wrotenbery and Forrest G.
Henderson, both 31, during an apparent robbery in their Houston apartment 10 years earlier.
Jackson, formerly of Missouri City, has insisted on his innocence.
He was linked to the slayings by DNA evidence and a bloody fingerprint on the apartment door.
The discovery of widespread problems at the HPD crime lab led investigators from the Harris County District Attorney's office in 2003 to order a retesting of the evidence in Jackson's case.
Guests: · Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
· Kenneth Williams, Prof.
A professor at South Texas College of Law, he is most recently the the author of the book MOST DESERVING OF DEATH?
He concludes that the application of the death penalty is inconsistent and incoherent, partly because of the U.
As an attorney for prisoners on Texas death row, Williams has been successful before the U.
Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and the U.
District Court in obtaining new trials and hearings.
· Charlie Doyle A transplanted New Yorker, he and his wife Pat are members of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.
They established a vigil to be held on execution nights at St.
Patrick Cathedral in El Paso.
Michael Perry Thursday, July 1, 2010 Execution confessed to authorities that he killed 50-year-old Sandra Stotler in her home near Conroe in 2001, then recanted, saying police had beat the confession out of him.
He claims he was in jail on an unrelated traffic charge during the period the state's medical examiner pinpointed as the time of death.
He blames co-defendant Jason Aaron Burkett for the shotgun slayings of Stotler and later Stotler's son, Adam, and Adam's friend, Jeremy Richardson.
Guests: · Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
· Otis Maclay A broadcast veteran, he usually co-hosts KPFT's The Monitor on Monday nights and is technical director of Execution Watch.
A former program director of KPFT, Otis came to Houston from KPFT's sister station in New York, WBAI.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Wirt, MD A Houston-area physician, he has been active for many years in efforts to abolish the death penalty and to improve health care for Americans.
His political essays have appeared in CounterPunch.
Jonathan Green Wednesday, June 30, 2010 Execution Convicted and sentenced to death in 2002 by an all-white jury in the murder of a 12-year-old white girl in Dobbin, Texas, a small town 60 miles northwest of Houston.
Green, who is African-American, suffers from mental illness, is functionally illiterate and is probably mentally retarded, according to his attorneys.
Supreme Court ruled in 2002 that the execution of mentally retarded people is illegal because it is cruel and unusual punishment.
Guests: · Otis Maclay A broadcast veteran, he usually co-hosts KPFT's The Monitor on Monday nights and is technical director of Execution Watch.
A former program director of KPFT, Otis came to Houston from KPFT's sister station in New York, WBAI.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Wirt, MD A Houston-area physician, he has been active for many years in efforts to abolish the death penalty and to improve health care for Americans.
His political essays have appeared in CounterPunch.
David Lee Powell Tuesday, June 15, 2010 Execution On death row more than three decades, Powell was convicted in the 1978 slaying of an Austin police officer.
Supreme Court refused to review Powell's death sentence in 2009.
He was sent to death row three separate times, including retrials.
Powell's attorneys said his due-process rights were violated when prosecutors held back documents indicating his girlfriend might have fired the fatal shots.
Of the 322 people on Texas death row, only five have been there longer than Powell.
He would be the state's longest-serving death row inmate to die by lethal injection.
Excell White was executed in 1999 after 24 years.
Guests: · Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
Burr Devotes his law practice entirely to death penalty defense.
Formerly in charge of the NAACP Capital Punishment Project, Burr was litigation director for Houston's now-defunct Texas Resource Center, which helped represent death row inmates.
In many years of capital defense work, his high-profile clients have included Gary Graham and Timothy McVeigh.
Burr and his wife, Mandy Welch, organized the Texas Defender Service to continue the work of the Resource Center.
· John Hollway Attorney and author of KILLING TIME, about John Thompson's 18-year struggle from death row to freedom following his wrongful conviction for the murder of a white hotel executive.
Thompson, who is black, was exonerated after evidence of his innocence -- long hidden by prosecutors -- came to light weeks before his execution.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
George Jones Wednesday, June 2, 2010 Execution Convicted in the 1993 robbery-murder of Forest Hall, who was abducted from the parking lot of a Dallas shopping mall.
Jones' attorneys say his verdict and sentence were reached unfairly, because the trial judge wrongly allowed Dallas County prosecutors to exclude a prospective juror perceived as friendly to the defense.
In a capital trial, a single holdout juror can mean the difference between life and death.
Guests: · Scott Christianson A writer, investigative reporter and historian, he is the author of The Last Gasp: The Rise and Fall of the American Gas Chamber.
It includes little-known facts about the gas chamber, including links to the eugenics movements and American-German collaboration to produce lethal hydrogen cyanide.
Among his other books is With Liberty for Some: 500 Years of Imprisonment in America, winner of the Robert F.
Kennedy Book Award Distinguished Honors and a Choice Outstanding Book Award.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
John Alba Tuesday, May 25, 2010 Execution Alba, 54, was convicted in the 1991 shooting death of his wife, Wendy Alba.
He was arrested in Plano, Texas, following a standoff with police in which he held a gun to his head and threatened to pull the trigger.
A federal court in 2000 overturned his death sentence because a psychologist testified improperly at his trial that jurors should consider the fact that he is Hispanic in deciding punishment.
Alba had a second punishment trial, at which a Collin County jury imposed the death penalty.
Guests: · Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
· Nancy Bailey Houston death penalty coordinator for Amnesty International, board member of Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Crystal Halprin An Austin business owner and wife of death row inmate Randy Halprin.
Crystal has made her voice heard at legislative hearings on the Texas law of parties.
Other states have laws of parties, which hold accomplices accountable for the actions of killers, but only Texas permits the death penalty for accomplices.
Rogelio Cannady Wednesday, May 19, 2010 Execution Cannady was in prison on a life sentence in 1993 when he was charged with killing his cellmate at the McConnell Unit in Beeville.
The victim was serving 15 years for murder.
Cannady was the first Texas prison inmate prosecuted under a 1993 statute permitting a charge of capital murder against an offender serving 99 years or life on a previous murder conviction.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Chris Castillo National-Texas outreach coordinator for Murder Victims Families for Reconciliation, Chris started his career as a reporter for a Texas newspaper and was covering the court beat when he learned his mother, Pilar Castillo, had been murdered in her Houston home in 1991.
Soon afterward, he began working with crime victims through a group that takes them into prison to help inmates see the impact of their crimes.
Billy John Galloway Thursday, May 13, 2010 Execution Billy John Galloway was condemned for the slaying of a man in Greenville, east of Dallas.
Galloway, Kevin Varga May 12 date and two women were arrested in the September 1998 robbery and beating death.
Guests: · Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Esteban Rogelio Garcia Raised in Bryan, Texas, Garcia was a heroin addict at 14, a convict at 19 and spent nearly two decades in and out of prison for various petty crimes before getting out for good.
A self-educated lawyer, he wrote The United States Jailhouse Lawyer's Manual.
Garcia is most recently the author of the autobiographical Journey Into My Soul.
He lives in Texas, where he works as a legal writer and consultant.
Kevin Varga Wednesday, May 12, 2010 Execution Kevin Varga was condemned for murder of a man in Greenville, east of Dallas, during a 1998 robbery by Varga, Billy John Galloway May 13 execution dateand two women.
The women pleaded to lesser charges.
Guests: · Sandrine Ageorges-Skinner French wife of Texas death row resident Hank Skinner, active in the fight to exonerate her husband and to abolish capital punishment altogether.
She chairs the International Committee of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and represents TCADP on the steering committee of the World Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.
· Otis Maclay A broadcast veteran, he usually co-hosts KPFT's The Monitor on Monday nights and is technical director of Execution Watch.
A former program director of KPFT, Otis came to Houston from KPFT's sister station in New York, WBAI.
· Lavette Ulichnie An organizer of monthly execution vigils at St.
Philip the Apostle Catholic Church in Lewiston, Texas, near Dallas.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
Samuel Bustamante Tuesday, April 27, 2010 Execution Bustamante was one of four people charged in the 1998 fatal stabbing of 27-year-old Rafael Alvarado of Richmond.
His attorney requested clemency from the state, arguing that Bustamante received inadequate representation from his state-appointed appellate attorney, who missed critical filing deadlines and failed to conduct any additional investigation of his client's background, which included serious abuse as a child.
Courts rejected Bustamante's arguments that his execution would be unconstitutional because he is retarded, with a tested IQ of 71.
Guests: · Sandrine Ageorges-Skinner French wife of Texas death row resident Hank Skinner, active in the fight to exonerate her husband and to abolish capital punishment altogether.
She chairs the International Committee of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty and represents TCADP on the steering committee of the World Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty.
· Robert Rosenberg A Houston attorney, he has been handling death row cases since the 1980s.
As a civil rights lawyer, he has represented clients on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union.
· Mark Miller, Fr.
The Odessa, Texas, priest leads a public vigil at St.
Joseph's Catholic Church from 5 to 6 p.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
William Berkley Thursday, April 22, 2010 Execution Berkley, a native of Germany, was living in El Paso and had just turned 21 when he and Michael Jacques were arrested in March 2000 and charged with the murder of a woman whose body had been found in the northeast section of the city.
Guests: · Paris Carriger On Dec.
Carriger had been on Arizona's death row since 1978.
The real murderer, whose false testimony had convicted Carriger, confessed to the crime in 1987.
But by then Carriger had exhausted his rights to appeal, and the Arizona courts refused to grant him a new trial.
More than a thousand letters supporting Carriger's plea for a new trial poured into Arizona.
At the last moment, a federal court issued a stay.
Carriger was granted a new trial by the 9th Circuit in December, 1997 because of the new evidence.
In January, 1999, he accepted a plea to a lesser offense and was immediately released from prison.
Further details of Carriger's ordeal are in "The Wrong Man" by Beth Hawkins and Kristin Solheim, Tuscon Weekly, December 1993.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Dennis Longmire Professor of criminal justice at Sam Houston State University and a frequent participant in Huntsville vigils.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Franklin Alix Tuesday, March 30, 2010 Execution Convicted in the January 1998 slaying of a man at an apartment complex in Houston, Alix is among hundreds of defendants whose DNA evidence was submitted for retesting because of questions about the way it was processed by the Houston Police Department's crime lab.
An investigation of the lab found that an analyst failed to report potentially exculpatory DNA test results from a murder that was cited in the penalty phase of Alix's capital murder trial.
Guests: · Steve McVicker As a crime reporter for the Houston Chronicle, he provided extensive coverage of scandalous conditions, methods and lack of controls in the HPD crime lab.
More recently, his book, I Love You Phillip Morris, about a con artist who escaped from Texas prisons four times, was made into an eponymous film starring Jim Carrey and Ewan McGregor.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
Henry Watkins Skinner Wednesday, March 24, 2010 Execution Condemned to die for the 1993 murders of his girlfriend and her two adult sons in the Texas Panhandle town of Pampa, "Hank" Skinner has always insisted he is innocent.
Northwestern journalism students investigating his conviction found numerous inconsistencies in the state's case.
His supporters have encountered a wall of resistance from the state their efforts to obtain testing of additional crime scene evidence gathered by police.
If the execution goes on as scheduled, protesters plan to gather outside the death house in Huntsville, where our reporters will provide live coverage.
Guests: · Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.
Joshua Maxwell Thursday, March 11, 2010 Execution Convicted in the shooting death of an off-duty Bexar County Deputy Sheriff in an alleged three-state crime spree 10 years ago with girlfriend Tessie McFarland, who is serving a life sentence.
Dubbed the "Natural Born Killers" couple, their case sold many newspapers and was fodder for the true-crime television series Wicked Attraction.
Guests: · Kobutsu Malone, Ven.
Venerable Kobutsu Malone is an ordained American Rinzai Zen Buddhist priest and co-founder of the Engaged Zen Foundation, a nonprofit that establishes contemplative meditative practices in prisons and encourages prison reform.
He has been involved in death row chaplaincy william hill complaints 1996, when he served as spiritual adviser for his student, Jusan Frankie Parker, during his execution by the State of Arkansas.
He was spiritual adviser for another student, Amos Lee King, during his 2003 execution in Florida.
· Jim Skelton Our show's legal analyst, Jim is an educator who has worked as a prosecutor and as a defense attorney in capital cases.
· Gloria Rubac A long-time activist against the death penalty and leader of the Death Penalty Abolition Movement, she reports from outside the death chamber in Huntsville.
· Dave Atwood A member of board of directors and past president of the Texas Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, he reports from TCADP's execution vigils in Houston.

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